Showing posts tagged science

Nobel physics prize awarded for LED discovery

BBC News: The Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to 3 scientists for their work in inventing blue LED lights, allowing a new generation of bright and energy-efficient lighting

Photo: A blue LED (SPL)

Earth may have underground ‘ocean’ three times that on surface

After decades of searching scientists have discovered that a vast reservoir of water, enough to fill the Earth’s oceans three times over, may be trapped hundreds of miles beneath the surface, potentially transforming our understanding of how the planet was formed.

Read more here

Malaria vaccine to be tested ‘within four to six weeks’

A promising new approach intended to imprison malaria causing parasites inside infected red blood cells has been developed by scientists.

Read more here

White House report: Climate change is harming the economy
Climate change “has moved firmly into the present,” as extreme weather has a negative impact on Americans’ everyday lives and the U.S. economy, a new White House report says.

The congressionally mandated National Climate Assessment, produced by more than 300 experts overseen by a panel of 60 scientists, concludes that the nation has already suffered billions of dollars in damages from severe weather-related disruptions, which it says will continue to get worse.

Read more from The Wall Street Journal.
Photo: A flooded cornfield near Oakville, Iowa, is seen in this unddated photo. (Scott Olson / Getty Images)

White House report: Climate change is harming the economy

Climate change “has moved firmly into the present,” as extreme weather has a negative impact on Americans’ everyday lives and the U.S. economy, a new White House report says.

The congressionally mandated National Climate Assessment, produced by more than 300 experts overseen by a panel of 60 scientists, concludes that the nation has already suffered billions of dollars in damages from severe weather-related disruptions, which it says will continue to get worse.

Read more from The Wall Street Journal.

Photo: A flooded cornfield near Oakville, Iowa, is seen in this unddated photo. (Scott Olson / Getty Images)

Electrical stimulator helps paralyzed men feel their legs again

NBC News: Researchers are shocked after an electrical stimulator has allowed men who were left paralyzed following spinal cord injuries to move their legs again.

Photo: Kent Stephenson raises his leg after undergoing stimulation of the spinal cord surgery (Courtesy of the University of Louisville)

Remains of King Alfred the Great believed to be found

Archaeologists say they may have found the pelvis bone of King Alfred the Great, who ruled England from 871 to 899 AD.

The team who exhumed the unmarked grave at a church in Winchester say they believe the bone is either that of Alfred or his son Edward the Elder.

Read more from ITV News.

Photo: The King Alfred statue in Winchester (Chris Ison / PA Wire)

New type of cockroach found in US for 1st time

A species of cockroach that can withstand harsh winter cold has been confirmed in the United States for the first time, AP reports.

Scientists suspect the species Periplaneta japonica was likely a stowaway in the soil of ornamental plants used to adorn New York’s High Line park.

Photo: AP Photo / University of Florida

New dinosaur discovered in Utah, scientists say
Scientists from Chicago’s Field Museum have discovered a new “top predator” dinosaur in a region of 100-million-year-old rock in Utah.
The 4-ton, 30-foot animal is a significant precursor to Tyrannosaurus rex and an important part of an emerging fossil record for the continent, the museum says.
Read more from the Chicago Tribune.

New dinosaur discovered in Utah, scientists say

Scientists from Chicago’s Field Museum have discovered a new “top predator” dinosaur in a region of 100-million-year-old rock in Utah.

The 4-ton, 30-foot animal is a significant precursor to Tyrannosaurus rex and an important part of an emerging fossil record for the continent, the museum says.

Read more from the Chicago Tribune.

Diamond rain falls on Jupiter and Saturn

BBC News: Jupiter and Saturn regularly experience diamond rain, scientists claim after examining new atmospheric data from the gas giants.

After falling, the diamonds are melted by the extreme heats of the planets’ cores into a liquid sea.

The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society in Denver, Colorado.

Photo: Diamonds (Science Photo Library)

Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded to 3 US scientists

Reuters: The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to US scientists Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshe who pioneered the use of computer models that mirror chemical reactions.





Photo: Chairman Sven Lidin (L-R), permanent secretary Staffan Normark and professor Gunnar Karlstrom of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announce the winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm October 9, 2013. (Credit: Reuters/Claudio Bresciani/TT News Agency)

Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded to 3 US scientists

Reuters: The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to US scientists Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshe who pioneered the use of computer models that mirror chemical reactions.

Photo: Chairman Sven Lidin (L-R), permanent secretary Staffan Normark and professor Gunnar Karlstrom of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announce the winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm October 9, 2013. (Credit: Reuters/Claudio Bresciani/TT News Agency)

Nobel Prize awarded to ‘God particle’ theorists

NBC News: The Nobel Prize in physics has been award to British physicist Peter Higgs and Belgian physicist Francois Englert for their work researching the elusive Higgs boson.

Photo: Belgian physicist Francois Englert and British physicist Peter Higgs converse during the 2012 news conference announcing the discovery of a new subatomic particle matching the description of the Higgs boson (Fabrice Coffrini / AFP / Getty Images file)

'Extremely likely' humans responsible for global warming

AP: It is ‘extremely likely’ that human activity is responsible for global warming observed since the 1950s, a report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says.

It is the strongest language that the group has adopted since its 2007 assessment in which it said global warming was ‘very likely’ man made.

Surgeons save Afghan girl born with 2 heads

AFP: Doctors in Afghanistan have successfully carried out life-saving surgery on a girl born with 2 heads.

'Her mother gave birth to twins, two girls. One girl was in good health but the other had an abnormality. She had an extra head attached to her head,' chief surgeon Dr Ahmad Obaid Mojadidi said.

Photo: 3-month-old Asree Gul (L) and her twin sister as they lie on a bed at a hospital in the eastern Afghanistan city of Jalalabad (AFP/Getty Images)
Expedition 37 arrives at International Space Station
NASA: NASA has confirmed that a new trio of Expedition 37 residents has arrived at the International Space Station, docking to the Poisk mini-research module Wednesday at 10:45 p.m. EDT aboard a Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft.
Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineers Mike Hopkins and Sergey Ryazanskiy are scheduled for a five-and-a-half month stay in space, living and working inside the orbital laboratory.
Image via NASA

Expedition 37 arrives at International Space Station

NASA: NASA has confirmed that a new trio of Expedition 37 residents has arrived at the International Space Station, docking to the Poisk mini-research module Wednesday at 10:45 p.m. EDT aboard a Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft.

Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineers Mike Hopkins and Sergey Ryazanskiy are scheduled for a five-and-a-half month stay in space, living and working inside the orbital laboratory.

Image via NASA

Hawaii warns molasses spill could draw sharks
Reuters: Hawaii’s health officials have warned swimmers, snorkelers and surfers to stay out of waters near Honolulu after a leak of 1,400 tons of molasses earlier in the week killed hundreds of fish. The officials say this spill could draw sharks.
So many fish have died that the Hawaii Department of Health has tripled cleanup crews to three boats. Hundreds of fish have been removed and thousands more are expected to be removed, a statement from the department said.
Photo credit: Dennis Oda / The Star-Advertiser via AP

Hawaii warns molasses spill could draw sharks

Reuters: Hawaii’s health officials have warned swimmers, snorkelers and surfers to stay out of waters near Honolulu after a leak of 1,400 tons of molasses earlier in the week killed hundreds of fish. The officials say this spill could draw sharks.

So many fish have died that the Hawaii Department of Health has tripled cleanup crews to three boats. Hundreds of fish have been removed and thousands more are expected to be removed, a statement from the department said.

Photo credit: Dennis Oda / The Star-Advertiser via AP