Showing posts tagged health

Electrical stimulator helps paralyzed men feel their legs again

NBC News: Researchers are shocked after an electrical stimulator has allowed men who were left paralyzed following spinal cord injuries to move their legs again.

Photo: Kent Stephenson raises his leg after undergoing stimulation of the spinal cord surgery (Courtesy of the University of Louisville)

Study: ‘16 and Pregnant’ may have reduced teen birthrate by 6%
The New York Times: MTV’s cautionary program, “16 and Pregnant,” and its spinoffs may have prevented more than 20,000 births to teenage mothers in 2010, according to a new economic study of Nielsen television ratings and birth records.

Study: ‘16 and Pregnant’ may have reduced teen birthrate by 6%

The New York Times: MTV’s cautionary program, “16 and Pregnant,” and its spinoffs may have prevented more than 20,000 births to teenage mothers in 2010, according to a new economic study of Nielsen television ratings and birth records.

FDA will require food industry to phase out trans fats
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration plans to announce today that it will require the food industry to gradually phase out all trans fats, saying they are a threat to people’s health. Read more from The Associated Press.
Photo: Robert Sullivan  /  AFP - Getty Images file

FDA will require food industry to phase out trans fats

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration plans to announce today that it will require the food industry to gradually phase out all trans fats, saying they are a threat to people’s health. Read more from The Associated Press.

Photo: Robert Sullivan  /  AFP - Getty Images file

Breast milk bought online may contain dangerous bacteria

NBC News: A new study shows that some breast milk bought online is contaminated and dangerous.

Nearly 75% of breast milk bought from a website was contaminated with high levels of disease-causing bacteria, including those found in human waste.

Photo: Courtesy Nationwide Children’s Hospital

Approval sought for world’s 1st malaria vaccine
BBC News: GlaxoSmithKline is seeking regulatory approval for the world’s first vaccine against malaria, after promising trial data showed that it cut cases of the often-fatal disease in African children.
The company has been developing the vaccine for 3 decades and plans to submit a regulatory application to the European Medicines Agency.
Malaria kills hundreds of thousands of people every year.
Photo: Malaria infected mosquitoes (AFP)

Approval sought for world’s 1st malaria vaccine

BBC News: GlaxoSmithKline is seeking regulatory approval for the world’s first vaccine against malaria, after promising trial data showed that it cut cases of the often-fatal disease in African children.

The company has been developing the vaccine for 3 decades and plans to submit a regulatory application to the European Medicines Agency.

Malaria kills hundreds of thousands of people every year.

Photo: Malaria infected mosquitoes (AFP)

Chris Christie signs New Jersey law easing medical marijuana restrictions for children

Reuters: New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has signed a bill allowing sick children greater access to medical marijuana. He had said he would do so if the state legislature agreed to revisions.

The revisions to the bill required that at least two doctors approve the treatment; the language was also tightened to make sure only minors could get access to edible forms of marijuana besides lozenges.

"This new law will help sick kids access the program while also keeping in place appropriate safeguards," Christie said.

Photo credit: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

Judge: NFL, players to settle concussion lawsuits
AP: The NFL and more than 4,500 former players are to resolve concussion-related lawsuits with a $765 million settlement, a federal judge says. The settlement would fund medical examples, concussion-related compensation, as well as medical research.
Plaintiffs include at least 10 members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, along with Super Bowl-winning quarterback Jim McMahon and the family of Pro Bowl linebacker Junior Seau, who committed suicide in 2012.
Photo: Junior Seau (Winslow Townson/AP)

Judge: NFL, players to settle concussion lawsuits

AP: The NFL and more than 4,500 former players are to resolve concussion-related lawsuits with a $765 million settlement, a federal judge says. The settlement would fund medical examples, concussion-related compensation, as well as medical research.

Plaintiffs include at least 10 members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, along with Super Bowl-winning quarterback Jim McMahon and the family of Pro Bowl linebacker Junior Seau, who committed suicide in 2012.

Photo: Junior Seau (Winslow Townson/AP)

Boy dies of bubonic plague in Kyrgyzstan
BBC: A 15-year-old herder, who appears to have been bitten by a flea, has died in Kyrgyzstan of the bubonic plague. Officials say it’s the first case in the country in 30 years.
Authorities have quarantined more than 100 people. Bubonic plague is rare in present times, though it killed an estimated 25 million people in Europe during the Middle Ages.

Boy dies of bubonic plague in Kyrgyzstan

BBC: A 15-year-old herder, who appears to have been bitten by a flea, has died in Kyrgyzstan of the bubonic plague. Officials say it’s the first case in the country in 30 years.

Authorities have quarantined more than 100 people. Bubonic plague is rare in present times, though it killed an estimated 25 million people in Europe during the Middle Ages.

19 children die after eating school lunch in India

AP: Nineteen children have died after eating free meals at a primary school in India. More children are sick.

Bihar state official Amarjit Sinha says 28 children have been hospitalized. Ten of them are in serious condition.

The children fell ill soon after eating meals in the school on Tuesday.

Young girl given bioengineered windpipe dies

New York Times: Hannah Warren, a toddler who became the youngest person ever to receive a bioengineered organ, has died, surgeons involved in her treatment said.

The girl, who was born without a trachea, died on Saturday. She would have turned three in August.

The initial operation to implant the bioengineered windpipe had also evolved surgery on the girl’s esophagus, which never healed properly. A pediatric surgeon says she underwent another operation a month ago to correct the problem and died from the complications that arose.

Treated for cancer, two men now appear free of HIV

NBC News: Two men who had grueling bone marrow treatments for cancer are enjoying a happy side effect: They appear free of the AIDS virus, researchers reported on Wednesday.

The doctors are not quite ready to call it a cure, but they say the men have stopped taking HIV drugs and have remained free of the virus for almost four months in one case and almost two months in another.

“While these results are exciting, they do not yet indicate that the men have been cured,” says Dr. Timothy Henrich of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Photo: Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, speaking at an AIDS research conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Steve Forrest / International AIDS Society)

El Salvador woman, denied abortion, has C-section

BBC: A woman who was denied an abortion by the Supreme Court in El Salvador has undergone a premature Caesarean section. The 22-year-old woman wanted to end the pregnancy because she was at risk due to lupus and kidney problems.

The fetus developed without a complete brain and skull and died shortly after birth.

Last week, the country’s Supreme Court upheld an absolute ban on abortions under any circumstances. However, the health minister said a Caesarean was an acceptable intervention.


Scientists to trial synthetic human blood 
Scotsman: Scottish scientists have been given the go-ahead for the world’s first trials in humans of synthetic blood.
Researchers based at the Scottish Centre for Regenerative Medicine (SCRM) in Edinburgh hope to use stem cells to manufacture blood on an industrial scale to help end shortages and prevent infections being passed on in donations.
The UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has now granted a licence so scientists can make blood from stem cells which can be tested in humans – the first step towards large-scale clinical trials, which will hopefully lead to the routine use of blood created in this way.

Photo: Donated blood (Tim Boyle  /  Getty Images file)

Scientists to trial synthetic human blood

Scotsman: Scottish scientists have been given the go-ahead for the world’s first trials in humans of synthetic blood.

Researchers based at the Scottish Centre for Regenerative Medicine (SCRM) in Edinburgh hope to use stem cells to manufacture blood on an industrial scale to help end shortages and prevent infections being passed on in donations.

The UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has now granted a licence so scientists can make blood from stem cells which can be tested in humans – the first step towards large-scale clinical trials, which will hopefully lead to the routine use of blood created in this way.

Photo: Donated blood (Tim Boyle  /  Getty Images file)

Angelina Jolie reveals double mastectomy in op-ed

Actress Angelina Jolie has written about her decision to have a preventative double mastectomy in a New York Times piece.

In the piece, Jolie writes:

My mother fought cancer for almost a decade and died at 56. She held out long enough to meet the first of her grandchildren and to hold them in her arms. But my other children will never have the chance to know her and experience how loving and gracious she was.

We often speak of “Mommy’s mommy,” and I find myself trying to explain the illness that took her away from us. They have asked if the same could happen to me. I have always told them not to worry, but the truth is I carry a “faulty” gene, BRCA1, which sharply increases my risk of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

Read more here.